Top 10 3D Printed Designs That Are The Best Of Sustainable Product Design

Top 10 3D Printed Designs That Are The Best Of Sustainable Product Design

Top 10 3D Printed Designs That Are The Best Of Sustainable Product Design

Top 10 3D Printed Designs That Are The Best Of Sustainable Product Design

3D printing is gaining momentum and popularity than ever! Designers and architects around the world now use 3D printing to create almost all types of products and structures. It is a technique widely used in product design, due to its simple and innovative nature. But designers don’t just use 3D printing to create basic models, they use this technique in amazing ways! From a stunning electric guitar with a 3D printed skeleton body to a pair of 3D printed shoes that will make you feel like Bigfoot – the scope of this reliable technique is limitless! Dive into this collection of humble yet groundbreaking 3D printed designs.

1. The Karen Ultralight

Designed by Anima Design for Katahashi Instruments, the Karen Ultralight is a dynamic electric violin that ditches conventional wooden acoustic chambers for something more eye-catching. The violin comes with a relatively hollow body made by a generative design, which still provides strength with minimal use of material.

Why is it remarkable?

The 3D printed generative frame sits on a carbon fiber body, with a birch fingerboard for an elevated yet familiar playing experience. The Karen Ultralight works just like an electric guitar and has a 1/4″ jack output, but even has an internal 9V battery and a headphone jack, so you can play ‘quiet’ music straight into your headphones without disturbing the neighbours. !

What do we like?

  • Uses a popular design technique called generative design
  • Can be easily mass-produced or even printed in left-handed variants

What we don’t like?

2. The Cryptide Sneaker

The Cryptide 3D sneaker Sintratec 2

The Cryptide Sneaker was designed by Stephan Henrich for Sintratec. The German architect and designer came up with a pair of full 3D shoes intended for laser sintering with a flexible TPE material. The shoes were formed and printed using a Sintratec S2 System 3D printer.

Why is it remarkable?

The Cryptide has a sole with an open design. The designer said it was made possible by SLS (Selective Laser Sintering) manufacturing and a material called Sintratec TPE Elastomer. Simply put, SLS is an additive manufacturing technique that uses a laser to sinter particles into a more solid 3D structure. Henrich and Sintratec worked together to realize the sneaker design.

What do we like?

  • The size and shape can adapt to the wearer’s foot
  • They remind us of the Adidas Futurecraft 4D!

What we don’t like?

  • They don’t score high on aesthetics + style
  • The shoes leave crazy footprints

3. We|aver+ or Weaver+ shoes


Young wearers need shoes that go beyond just fit and comfort, but can also help their feet grow properly, avoiding potential health problems that can arise later in life. Such shoes are often labeled as “therapeutic” and have expensive price tags, but We|aver+ wants to make these types of shoes more accessible and easier to make, all thanks to 3D printing.

Why is it remarkable?

We|aver+ or Weaver+ for example, 3D print something akin to knit fabric, except it uses elastic TPU as its material. The shoes it prints look more like chainmail than conventional fabric, and for good reason. The hollow-loose knit structure gives the shoes the flexibility needed to support children’s growing feet.

What do we like?

  • Shoes can be adapted to the specific needs and requirements of the wearers

What we don’t like?

4. The Vine Collection


It turns out that sawdust can actually be used as a material to make other things, thanks to the almost magical technology of 3D printing. 3D printers can now use almost any kind of source material, from metal to chocolate to PET bottles, so it was only a matter of time before someone came up with the bright idea of ​​using sawdust as well. And to test the usefulness of this proprietary process, a range of beautiful home accessories was created to demonstrate the flexibility and quality of 3D printed sawdust products.

Why is it remarkable?

The Vine collection includes a vase-like vessel, tray, basket and bowl that looks like a series of wooden rods twisted to create pleasing curves and shapes. No glues or additional connecting parts were used to finish their shapes, so the products were durable and recyclable from start to finish.

What do we like?

  • Serves as a metaphor for the organic character of trees that ultimately end up as source material for these products

What we don’t like?

5. 3D printed products from Otrivin Air Lab


Mother Nature already has her own little air purifiers, and we can not only use them to clean the air, but we can even harvest them to make products that in turn don’t harm the planet. That is the thesis that the interactive exhibition Otrivin Air Lab in Londo tries to present, and it forces visitors not only to observe the process, but also to actively participate in it. The space is enclosed in a lightweight and reversible wood structure and one of the walls contains twelve ‘photobioreactors’. These are tall glass vessels filled with ten liters of living photosynthetic microalgae that absorb CO2 and release oxygen, while simultaneously producing biomass. Every day, that wall can absorb 240 g of CO2 and expel 180 g of oxygen and 84 g of biomass.

Why is it remarkable?

Visitors to the lab can participate in the daily harvest of that biomass product which is then converted into bioplastics, biorubbers and 3D printing filaments. These raw materials can then be used to make biodegradable and sustainable products, such as vases and even stools. Some may find it a little disturbing, but the fact that you’re sitting on what is practically CO2 and air pollution should feel empowering. We may not be able to completely eradicate unclean air, but at least we can turn it into something harmless and useful.

What do we like?

  • The lab aims to demonstrate the viability and sustainability of a circular economy
  • Nasal care company Otrivin, which participated in this exhibition, will use this process to make its Fibonacci NetiPot Nasal Sprays

What we don’t like?

6. The Polyformer


The Polyformer looks interesting from the start and the name sounds like something taken from fictional literature. Its translucent white appearance is due to the fact that it is made from recycled PET plastic bottles, giving it a look that also serves its purpose.

Why is it remarkable?

In a nutshell, the machine slices and melts PET bottles to turn them into filaments as small as 1.75mm in diameter. These recycled plastic threads can then be used in regular 3D printers to make more things, probably with the same signature translucent appearance as the Polyformer.

What do we like?

  • Offers an alternative to the traditional way PET bottles are recycled
  • The designer has provided all the information needed to recreate it yourself

What we don’t like?

7. Wabo


Wabo is a collection of handboards made from plastic waste produced from 3D printed prototyping. Every day, 8 million pieces of plastic end up in the ocean. That’s a lot of plastic. While some brands are committed to gimmicky sustainable practices that have more to do with marketing than carbon neutral manufacturing, others are learning how to make something from the plastic waste they produce.

Why is it remarkable?

The multidisciplinary design studio Uido Design is a studio known for its catalog of 3D printable product designs and the team does something about the waste they produce during the design process. Uido Design shreds the plastic waste produced by 3D printing into bits and pieces and uses the waste to create handboards that allow users to ride the ocean waves.

What do we like?

  • The hand plates are handmade

What we don’t like?

  • Not a necessary product, but still fun!

8. Resting Reefs


Resting Reefs is a system of artificial reefs 3D printed from the cremated ashes of deceased loved ones.

Why is it remarkable?

The scattering of the ashes of family members who have crossed the ocean is a wonderful way to remember loved ones. While the symbolism behind it is that you should throw the ashes of your loved ones to the wind, Louise Lenborg Skajem and Aura Elena Murillo Pérez, graduates of the Royal College of Art, developed a way to still remember our deceased loved ones while protecting endangered ecosystems. in the method. Resting Reef, a series of artificial reefs made from cremated ash using 3D technologies, marks the culmination of Lenborg Skajem and Murillo Pérez’s studies at RCA.

What do we like?

  • Allow relatives to visit the eternal resting places of their loved ones
  • The 3D printed mounds provide ideal growing conditions for oysters

What we don’t like?

9. The Throne


This sustainable toilet is designed to compost solid waste while tackling the sanitation crisis – using design and technology to do good! It is a solution that eradicates plastic waste and turns it into a construction material that reduces the load on landfills.

Why is it remarkable?

Created by Spanish design studio Nagami and To, it is named The Throne and consists of three parts: a teardrop-shaped body, a dramatic double-curved sliding door and a solid waste bucket. All parts were printed within three days, including the base and some smaller accessories that were either painted or ordered. It also includes a ready-to-use separation toilet seat to separate urine from solids for composting.

What do we like?

  • Sustainable design that fights the sanitation crises
  • The teams used waste medical plastic equipment from European hospitals for the prototype

What we don’t like?

10. Cullan . 3D Printed Shoes


Designed in the metaverse by Cullan Kerner, the shoes embody an aesthetic best described as “strangely refreshing,” and the reason being that it doesn’t meet the limitations of normal shoe design intended for mass production. The shoe design process is highly standardized – you have preset sizes, materials that are readily available, dies for cutting/shaping these materials and processes such as sewing or gluing that bring them together

Why is it remarkable?

However, Cullan’s design process is completely different. For starters, the shoes are made entirely in Gravity Sketch, a free VR software that lets you design directly in a 3D space. Cullan designed the shoes almost like a sculptor makes a work of art, creating in 3D space. The shoes are made for 3D printing – a process that is still not widely accepted by the shoe industry. The idea is simple: Cullan’s model is imported into a 3D printing software and the printer painstakingly builds the design layer by layer using a single flexible elastomeric material.

What do we like?

  • Each shoe can be designed to fit you perfectly, and they are all made to order
  • Available as NFTs

What we don’t like?

  • They are not in production!

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